Author Archives: Affinity Bridge

Teaching for Joy & Justice: Re-imagining English Language Arts by Pamela Richardson

Welcome to our Summer 2013 edition of English Practice, Teaching for Joy & Justice: Re-imagining English Language Arts. Here you will find articles inspired by BCTELA’s 2012 conference and its theme. Topics range from deepening students’ conversations about books, to the power and possibilities of graphic novels, to the questioning of rubrics as a form of assessment (have you ever wished you had a rubric for your dog? Hmm…). You will also find a book review about digital tools in the English Language Arts classroom, and an article that inquires deeply into the use of technology within learning communities as re-imagined through the Occupy Movement. Then there is the poetry – poetry that draws us joyfully through language into a re-imagining of how we live in the world, how we love the world, and how we hold our deepest beliefs about what society could be.

Teaching for Joy & Justice- Re-imagining English Language Arts by Pamela Richardson pdf

To see the full Spring 2013 issue, click here pdf

5 Years Later, by Megan Jakse

I remember feeling pleased with myself as I posted spreadsheets full of marks, several years ago. The essays had been graded, missing assignments had been assigned zeros, and my students would be able to check their progress in anticipation of the upco ming “marks cut – off day.” I occasionally heard a student exclaim, “Argh! She’s giving me 36%!” as he or she examined the spreadsheet. That sort of comment always frustrated me. I was not “giving” the student 36%. Rather, he or she had not submitted as signments. I began to realize that, for some students, the grade on the spreadsheet was the grade that they identified with; they did not see opportunity to improve, but they saw their own “failure” in the course and, therefore, my failure as a teacher.

5 Years Later: Assessment, by Megan Jakse pdf

Podcasting Saved My Sanity, by Leslie Forsyth-Eno

Insanity Threatened

Four years ago, as a fairly new Grade Seven classroom teacher, I discovered that I was not always the supportive, understanding type of teacher I had envisioned myself to be. Having come from a student services background I was mor e accustomed to working with students one – on – one, or in small groups, not having to meet the myriad demands of twenty – eight plus students. One area that particularly taxed my patience was the daily help students needed after school because they had been aw ay for reasons that were not necessarily related to illness viagra generique.

Podcasting Saved My Sanity, by Leslie Forsyth-Enopdf

Why Grade When They Can Reflect? by Royan Lee

The instructional video project was so fun! I’m very proud of how my video looks. I love how the voice over that I did didn’t have any sounds that I didn’t want. (the room was VERY LOUD). I had to record over and over to get it the way I wanted. I also love the way the music went so it didn’t stand out. I just wanted it to be background music.

pdfWhy Grade When They Can Reflect? by Royan Lee