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It’s HERE!!

The BC Teachers of English Language Arts presents its Fall Conference:

Story and the Landscapes of Learning

October 23rd, 2015

Matthew McNair Secondary School

9500 No 4 Road

Richmond, BC

Story and the Landscapes of Learning brings together educators who are committed to teaching practices that respect nd engage diverse learners. This year we feature sessions focusing on inquiry, diverse texts, indigenous perspectives, the new curriculum and stories of place and learning.

Featuring: Richard Wagamese, David J. Smith, Faye Brownlie, Sharon Jeroski, Leyton Schnellert, Carl Leggo, Dale Allender and many more!

Read with us!

If you haven’t yet had a chance to join the BCTELA summer book club, don’t worry: you still can! The coordinated date has been extended to July 6th.
This year we are reading about theories of Place-Based education. As this topic is still emerging as a area of study, we will be reading four articles rather than a single text.
Let us know if you have questions. If you’re ready to read, please download the form and send it to the address you’ll find at the bottom. We will send you the articles. The first two will be discussed on Twitter on July 9th, and the second two on August 11th (see the Important Dates in the sidebar to the left).

Summer is #BCTELAbook Club Season

Summer book clubWe are pleased to announce BCTELA’s third annual professional literature book club. Three years ago we started a pattern of book clubs over the summer as a lead-up to our fall conference. We have traditionally chosen professional literature authored by our upcoming keynote as a way to extend and deepen the conversations surrounding the themes of our conference.
This year we are continuing to connect our professional book club to the October conference. But this time, rather than choosing a text by our keynote speaker, we are using the theme of the conference as inspiration. The theme of the 2015 BCTELA provincial conference is “Story and the Landscapes of Learning” and centres on the ideas of place-based learning and the stories which make up our experience of ‘place.’

Instead of selecting one professional book as our book club text, we have chosen to build a text-set of four articles. The articles have been carefully chosen to provide a comprehensive foundation from which to further explore and discuss what it means to teach BC students to read and write stories set in BC.
The discussion format will be similar to what we have done in the past: we will use Twitter as an accessible platform and divide the reading into a few hour-long twitter chats. The chats will be on July 9th from 10-11am, and on August 11th from 11am-12pm. As usual, our tweets will be delineated by the hashtag #bctelabook.

If you are interested in reading along with us, download and fill out the 2015 BCTELA book club application and email it to Celia Brogan (address on the form) by June 25th.

It’s Time to Get to Know Patrick Lane

Posted by Pamela Richardson

Washita by Patrick Lane
Harbour Publishing, Madeira Park, BC. 2014

If you are looking for new poems from a BC writer that are both masterful yet accessible for adolescent readers and writers then Patrick Lane’s more recent collection, Washita, is a wonderful selection. His imagery, often drawn from the natural world of BC and Western Canada is relatable and evocative, and his language is powerful, often direct and not overly obscure (“I woke up on Six Mile Creek, a willow grouse falling from the sky”) helping us to get to the emotional truth of a moment. He generously provides a glossary at the end to give context for more obscure references, which adds an interesting historical and linguistic layer and commentary. In this glossary we learn that a washita is a sharpening stone fashioned out of white quartz rock from the Ouachita Mountains of Arkansas.

The collection itself was fashioned extremely slowly, as Lane explains in the afterwards to the book. Due to a frozen right shoulder he could not raise his right hand to the keyboard. Lane, a right-handed, one-fingered typist, painstakingly crafted each poem using his non-dominant left index finger. Moreover, his left hand (and right side of his brain) did not know, as his right-hand did, where the letters on the keyboard were and so he had to search out each letter, each time, for each word: T—h—e…. Even simple little words took a while. This gave him lots of time to consider what he wanted to say and how. This writing process brings a stillness and meditative quality to the work and a sense of the poems being utterly balanced.

I had the chance to hear Patrick Lane read from this collection at the book’s launch in the Fall of 2014 in Victoria. Lane is a superb reader of his own work. While I don’t have a clip from Washita, I recommend clips such as this one to hear him read his work.

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