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Kit Pearson: a little magic in Victoria

posted by Celia Brogan

Kit Pearson has authored a number of popular novels for young and adolescent readers. Three of these are specifically set in BC and are great ways to help readers see the stories around them.

Awake and Dreaming is set primarily in Victoria and includes Pearson’s trademark element of magical realism.  The magical element first enables the young protagonist to escape the difficulties in her life, but then provides the safety she needs to clearly address her troubles.

The Whole Truth and its sequel And Nothing but the Truth are historical novels set in the 1930s on a Gulf Island and Victoria, respectively.  Emily Carr features as a character in the second book as Polly struggles with the trials and tribulations of growing up and going to boarding school, as well as some big family secrets.

 

Listening to where we live

Posted by Celia Brogan

Listening to the sounds in our local environment is a great way to enter into a study of place.

Today’s BC text is Sara Leach‘s Sounds of the Ferry. This picture book was nominated for the 2012/13 Chocolate Lily Book award. As the name implies, the narrative is full of onomatopoetic examples of what a BC ferry rider would hear on a crossing.

This text could be a great mentor text for an exercise in representing a particular place or experience through sound. Sounds of the Ferry might introduce activities to:

Sara Leach is an author and teacher-librarian who lives in Whistler, BC. Check out her CWILL profile.

Do you have a text to share that would compliment this one? Share it in the comments!

Read Local BC

Happy April!

Last year we celebrated Poetry Month by posting every school day in April. This year we’re still featuring poetry in our schools, but here at bctela.ca we are going to focus on a different series.

The Association of Book Publishers of BC (@abpbc) has launched a fabulous celebration of local publishing and has announced their Read Local BC campaign for April 2015.

Check out their website for literary events in your community (or one nearby).

We will celebrate in our own way throughout April by posting about local authors, titles, and series we like to use with our students. Do you have a favourite BC author or text you use in your practice? Share it with us in the comments.

Book club Twitter chats – my strategy

submitted by Kelley Inden (@ksinden)

I figured I would share how I go about participating in a book club chat on Twitter. My guess is that there is a better way, perhaps even ‘an app for that’, but here is how I do it. Please feel free to pass along your own wisdom in the comments section.

Obviously, I first read the book and take note of where my attention is snagged. Sometimes I use post-it notes to hold my thinking, or I write in the book if it belongs to me. With this one, I bought the book on my e-reader, so I just used the bookmark and notes function.

Next, I open my Twitter account and open up a new tweet. I compose each tweet in that box to ensure the character count is accurate, and then cut and paste the tweet into a Pages or Word document.

 

Medicine Walk quote2

When the Twitter chat commences, I select and tweet as seems appropriate.

I find that during the chat I don’t have the time to compose more than responses to other people’s ideas. If I have something I want to be sure to share, having the tweets ready to go is the only way for me.

Hope to chat with you on Sunday!

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