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Call for Articles – Share your Practice!

English Practice Call for articles: 

In line with the BCTELA 2016 conference theme, English Practice invites you to submit teaching ideas, classroom inquiries and practice-focused research, reflective and critical narratives, poems, fiction and other arts-based renderings, as well as, book reviews for our upcoming issue.

Entitled Empowering Learners; Renewing our Practice this broadly-themed issue opens a space for exploration and conversation around all that brings a sense of empowerment, vitality, agency and deeper purpose to the learning and teaching of English Language Arts.

Questions to consider might include:

What does empowerment mean and look like for students?  What role does language, literacy and/or literature have in student empowerment? How do I nurture a sense agency in my students? How might I use texts and/or literature to help students understand themes of power and agency? How do I maintain vitality and feel empowered as a teacher?

We have four sections to assist you in preparing and submitting your writing:

  • Teaching Ideas (classroom lessons and strategies)
  • Investigating our Practice (teacher inquiry)
  • Salon (Literary & arts-based pieces)
  • Check this Out (book reviews)

Deadline: March 15th, 2017. Anticipated publication Summer 2017. 

Editors: Sara Florence Davidson and Ashley Cail

More detail can be found by following this link.

Please send your queries and completed submissions to:

englishpracticejournal@gmail.com

Please see this page for our guidelines for submission. 

See our previous journal, Fall 2016 Story and the Landscapes of Learning for inspiration!

English Practice wants your writing about place, identity and English language arts!

English Practice, the journal of the BC Teachers of English Language Arts, is a peer-reviewed, open access, online publication published twice annually.

We accept submissions under the following categories:

  • Teaching Ideas (classroom lessons and strategies)
  • Investigating our Practice (teacher inquiry)
  • Salon (Literary & arts-based pieces)
  • Check this Out (book reviews)

In line with the theme of the 2015 BCTELA conference we invite you to submit pieces for our our upcoming issue.

Call for articles – Spring 2016:  Story and the Landscapes of Learning 

A pheasant rises wild from the pea vines. 

A shadow settles in the maze of poverty grass. 

Home at last, I scrub my hands, the peasant’s song in me. 

(Patrick Lane, Washita, 2014, p. 50)

Powerful stories are located in our personal and social geographies. Our stories both shape our world and are shaped by our world, helping us to create identities from individual and shared experiences. In line with the BCTELA 2015 conference theme, English Practice invites you to submit teaching ideas, classroom inquiries and practice-focused research, reflective and critical narratives, poems, fiction and other arts-based renderings, as well as book reviews for our upcoming themed issue on place-based learning and English language arts. Entitled Story and the Landscapes of Learning this issue delves into the vital relationships between identity and the places in which we live and learn. We invite pieces that explore the role of place in informing our stories, our literacies and our practices, and pieces that help us to understand the role of English language arts in deepening our relationship to place and the environment.

Questions to consider might include:

How are we shaped by the places in which we live and learn? How is our environment our teacher? How does place influence our teaching practices? How do we make visible our relationships to our environment? What kinds of learning experiences do we owe our students so they can connect with, see themselves in, and become stewards of the places in which they live? How can we help students develop their own sense of home, place and identity through writing and texts?

Deadline: January 31st, 2016

Please see our <a href="http://bctela.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/Criteria-and-guidelines acheter viagra original.pdf”>Criteria and guidelines for more information about the submission process, and send your queries and completed submissions to: englishpracticejournal@gmail.com

Editors: Pamela Richardson, Sara Davidson and Ashley Cail

 

 

Writing Poetry by Susan Stenson

Before Eve left the garden, she tugged Adam’s sleeve and said,

One more, one more. You would think it was the pomegranate

branch she wanted, the round, drab bush dribbling myth

above a tedious brook or to retrieve a copy of The Temptation of Baghdad, (more…)

Teaching for Joy & Justice: Re-imagining English Language Arts by Pamela Richardson

Welcome to our Summer 2013 edition of English Practice, Teaching for Joy & Justice: Re-imagining English Language Arts. Here you will find articles inspired by BCTELA’s 2012 conference and its theme. Topics range from deepening students’ conversations about books, to the power and possibilities of graphic novels, to the questioning of rubrics as a form of assessment (have you ever wished you had a rubric for your dog? Hmm…). You will also find a book review about digital tools in the English Language Arts classroom, and an article that inquires deeply into the use of technology within learning communities as re-imagined through the Occupy Movement. Then there is the poetry – poetry that draws us joyfully through language into a re-imagining of how we live in the world, how we love the world, and how we hold our deepest beliefs about what society could be.

Teaching for Joy & Justice- Re-imagining English Language Arts by Pamela Richardson pdf

To see the full Spring 2013 issue, click here pdf

5 Years Later, by Megan Jakse

I remember feeling pleased with myself as I posted spreadsheets full of marks, several years ago. The essays had been graded, missing assignments had been assigned zeros, and my students would be able to check their progress in anticipation of the upco ming “marks cut – off day.” I occasionally heard a student exclaim, “Argh! She’s giving me 36%!” as he or she examined the spreadsheet. That sort of comment always frustrated me. I was not “giving” the student 36%. Rather, he or she had not submitted as signments. I began to realize that, for some students, the grade on the spreadsheet was the grade that they identified with; they did not see opportunity to improve, but they saw their own “failure” in the course and, therefore, my failure as a teacher.

5 Years Later: Assessment, by Megan Jakse pdf

Podcasting Saved My Sanity, by Leslie Forsyth-Eno

Insanity Threatened

Four years ago, as a fairly new Grade Seven classroom teacher, I discovered that I was not always the supportive, understanding type of teacher I had envisioned myself to be. Having come from a student services background I was mor e accustomed to working with students one – on – one, or in small groups, not having to meet the myriad demands of twenty – eight plus students. One area that particularly taxed my patience was the daily help students needed after school because they had been aw ay for reasons that were not necessarily related to illness viagra generique.

Podcasting Saved My Sanity, by Leslie Forsyth-Enopdf

Why Grade When They Can Reflect? by Royan Lee

The instructional video project was so fun! I’m very proud of how my video looks. I love how the voice over that I did didn’t have any sounds that I didn’t want. (the room was VERY LOUD). I had to record over and over to get it the way I wanted. I also love the way the music went so it didn’t stand out. I just wanted it to be background music.

pdfWhy Grade When They Can Reflect? by Royan Lee

Unlocking Motivation for Student Reading, by Mike Ross

Let’s face it: we are all guilty of using techniques in our practice that do not feel quite right achat viagra pilule. Oftentimes, we stick with these practices because we know that they are old stand-bys for many teachers. Sometimes, it is because we simply cannot find a better way. We may tinker with the criteria or the manner of presentation, but are never fully satisfied with the results.

pdfUnlocking Motivation for Student Reading, by Mike Ross

Editorial, by Matt Rosati

What Else to Unlearn?

I think a lot about the things in teaching that we take for granted traditions and conventional wisdom that are true because they always have been true. I’ve also been thinking how much some of these “truths” crumble when they are held up to research-based examination. One of the more recent topics that has made me reconsider my beliefs is play, an experience I’d like to share.

Editorial, by Matt Rosatipdf

 

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