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Don’t have much time? Try this.

Posted by Celia Brogan

We’re all so busy. We are passionate educators and want the best learning experiences for our students and there are always so many things we want to plan for them, and learn for ourselves. Finding new local texts to offer our students is something that can take a bit of time if we don’t have reliable sources to which to turn.

Choc Lily logoWell here is a source for you: The Chocolate Lily Book Awards is a reader’s choice award for young BC readers reading BC authors and illustrators. Read your way through the shortlist (or give the titles to your students) for a great snapshot of some of the best current BC books for young and middle years readers.

Even better, register your class (or ask your teacher-librarian to register your school) and vote for your favourites! What a great way to participate in our province’s reading culture.

Journey to Cowichan’s Past

posted by Celia Brogan

Students at times have trouble identifying with historical events, especially when those events occurred to a cultural group other than the one(s) with which they are familiar. One way to assist students to identify and begin to understand the emotional and social costs of past injustices is historical fiction.

There is a specific type of historical fiction that I have always found particularly engaging: that which tells of a protagonist who finds herself pulled back through time and experiences a series of historical events firsthand.  There are a handful of great examples of this motif in YA literature: Fog Magic by Julia Sauer, Handful of Time by Kit Pearson, and The Grave by James Heneghan, to name just a few.
Today’s BC lit post adds Hannah and the Spindle Whorl and Hannah and the Salish Sea by Carol Ann Shaw to that list.

In the first book Hannah lives in present-day Cowichan Bay. On her walk through a patch of forest one day she discovers an old Salish spindle whorl and it transports her back in time where she meets Yisella, a Salish girl her own age.  They become friends and it is through this friendship that Hannah witnesses a small portion of the cultural pillaging that occurred when white Europeans started spreading out along South Coastal BC.

It looks as though a third book about Hannah is coming out this fall. This is a great trilogy to incorporate into a unit learning about the history of the peoples and cultures of South Coastal BC.

Homegrown, and still growing

Posted by Celia Brogan

What writing is more homegrown BC writing than that of our students? The BCTELA Student Writing Contest is more than a great way for students to give their writing a broader audience, the published pieces, Voices Visible, is also a useful resource to show our students what their peers are writing.

BCTELA members receive a copy of Voices Visible free, and you can order additional copies to make up a lit circle/text set group, or enough for a whole class set.

BC features as a setting in many of the pieces in Voices Visible, either completely or sometimes as a juxtaposition to an immigrant’s home of origin. Students can find their home in these pieces written by their peers in a way that may be different than from pieces written by adults. Do you have back issues of Voices Visible? Try it: copy a piece or two and see what your students think, or try including a book or two in a poetry text set.

This year’s submissions are due at the end of this month. Click here for the application form and contest rules. You must be a current BCTELA member to submit your students’ work.

Poetry Month: day 20

Well, this April has been pretty good, poetry-wise.  I will finish this series by telling you about a poetry month initiative I run in my school.  The idea was shared with me by a colleague and I’ve modified it a bit.  I wouldn’t be surprised if other schools do it too.  It’s called Poem in my Pocket and my version is simple:
To participate in Poem in my Pocket students must

  1. find a poem they like (in a book, online, on a bus, anywhere!), or write one of their own
  2. copy that poem onto a piece of paper.
  3. carry that piece of paper in their pocket a while.
  4. bring the poem to me and read it aloud to me.
  5. repeat.

I then take their poem and post it on my “poetry wall” until the end of the month, at which time I put all the poems in a bin and draw a winner for a poetry-related prize.  Students may carry/read/enter as many poems as they like.  This year I have a grade three student who has entered approximately twelve poems–she shows up every few days with two or three new ones to read to me; a few years ago I had a student who entered between 20-30 poems, all authored by her.  I love how this ‘event’ brings out the poetry bugs in my students.

This year the prize is two tickets to the Poetry in Voice finals.  I thought it would be the perfect prize to go hear older students reciting poetry when that’s what these students have been doing for me.

Thank you for celebrating Poetry Month with us here at BCTELA.
I will leave you with a simile one of my grade five students wrote today:

The apple blossoms sway like swings carrying the wind.

 

Poetry Month: day 19

Well, April is almost over.  There has been lots of poetry at my school this month, I hope there has been at yours too.

Yesterday I sat down to have an informal book club meeting with a colleague (we’ve been trying to read a professional text on teaching creative writing and it’s been a sporadic endeavour) and our conversation went from creative writing, to chatting about a collaborative social studies project we’re doing together,  to having a SUPER AWESOME poetry brainwave!

My colleague, Kelly, and I were discussing how we might build a short poetry piece into her class’ creative writing for term three, when we got of topic talking abut some struggles her students were having with the big social studies project they’re doing.

The SS project is called Historica.  You may have something like it at your school: students choose a historical event, within their grade-based time period, to research and produce a variety of products to show their understanding.  All the intermediate students participate and there is a big celebration at the end.

What we ended up with was a great solution to both these issues: we have decided to teach her students a simplified version of epic, or narrative, poetry.   I teach Kelly’s prep time so we have lots of class time to work with.  We will start with a review of basic figurative language (simile, metaphor, personification, alliteration.)  I will practice those with the class until the students have a general facility with them.  Kelly will focus on voice and word choice in the non-fiction writing they’re doing for their research project.  Soon I will start to read some story-poems and tell them about epic poetry.  We will talk about narrators in prose texts (fiction and non-fiction) and in poetry.  They will write their own story poems, on topics of their own choice (or maybe we’ll do the stories of movies they already know, like Frozen) and I will ask them to use at least one each of the basic devices so I can check their understanding.  Eventually we will hand out story/poetry frames that Kelly and I have written, tailored to each of their Historica topics (such as “the last spike,” “the potlatch ban,” and “the war of 1812.”)  For instance, for the group researching the potlatch ban, the frame might start with a narrative voice explaining the significance of the potlatch to the Haida people, followed by the voice/perspective of an enforcing Indian Agent, followed by the voice/perspective of a Haida chief or other member of the community, finished by the effect of the ban.  The frame is simple, but it provides the two grade 4 students a guide with some of the basic aspects of their topic (which is challenging for them).  They will have to write a four-section narrative poem, based on their research, and using figurative language appropriate to the form.

I’m looking forward to seeing if this works, and what kind of results we get (in products, and in students’ enduring understandings.)

Poetry Month: day 14

Happy Earth Day!

I taught again today the lesson I described on day 10. It was another group of 6/7s and I used the same poems from Joyful Voices for them to practice and present.  One difference was that I didn’t use the Shane Koyczan “To This Day” as the introduction.  I found that, while a great piece, it didn’t exhibit the particular characteristics of slam poetry I wanted my students to notice and attempt to imitate: Koyczan’s piece is too polished, too smooth.

Luckily, the other night I came across this piece from the Brave New Voices festival slam competition (this particular piece has been picked up by Upworthy and made a round on facebook so you may have seen it.)  It is a poem for two voices, which is great for my students to see and hear what I’m going to be asking them to do in the second part of the lesson.  I ask them to listen for how the two voices work together, and off each other.  This piece is by two young women and is on the subject of religious stereotypes le viagra pas cher.

If you poke around the Brave New Voices website, you will find the Speak Green page.  What a perfect source for Earth Day!  (you can use it next year.)  This collection of environmental poetry is a pretty cool spark to inspire some of our young poets to challenge themselves to focus their creative voices on a issue that matters to all of us.

 

Poetry Month: day 10

I am introducing performance poetry to my students this week.  My plan is to give them a taste of an example and then move into two-voice poems.

I will introduce them to Shane Koyczan by showing them the first six and a half minutes of this,  and then I’ll hand out poems I’ve photocopied from a wonderful book by Paul Fleischman called Joyful Noise: Poems for Two Voices.  Because I want this to be an intro (and because I have limited time) I will give some of the shorter poems to some pairs but most I will give to groups of four and ask them to switch paired readers halfway through.

They will have the end of this first period and the beginning of our next to read through and practice their poems.  We will read them out to each other at the end of the second period…. unless they really want more time, then I might push it to next week and give them an extra period.  If I do give them more time I will likely do a second mini-lesson on performance speaking so that they have the tools to work with over the longer time-frame.

 

p.s. I found it harder than anticipated to find good, not too long, examples of performance or slam poetry that was acceptable and/ or engaging for an elementary audience.  If you know of a good source, please share!

Poetry Month: day 7

I’ve written about one found poetry idea already in this series.  Today I will give you a variation on found poetry that I did a few months ago with some of my classes.

One of the various creative writing starts I do with my classes is have them listen to music and write to the mood of the music.  I had done that already this year and wanted to use music again, but with a different focus.  I chose to play several songs from an album and asked my students to listen to the words, as best they could, and write down whatever they heard.  We all made a real time list of the words that jumped out at us from the songs (I did it too, on the board, which helped my ELLs) prix du viagra au luxembourg.  Once we had listened to the first 2 songs, I turned down the music and let the students write whatever type of piece they wanted, while trying to use as many of their words as possible.  Again, while they were writing, I modeled with my own piece on the board – those who needed the model used it as an example, those who didn’t need it focused on their own writing.

The album I used this time is called Steal the Light by a band named The Cat Empire.  They are school-appropriate, upbeat, and have sometimes poetic, sometimes abstract lyrics.

Poetry Month: day 6

I have been doing a poetry activity with a grade 3/4 class this week inspired by the collection of poems by Mary O’Neill titled Hailstones and Halibut Bones.  All the poems in the book are about a colour and are listy-type poems describing what each colour looks, smells, sounds, tastes, and feels like.  There is a nice (but not intimidating) combination of literal and metaphorical examples in each poem.

After reading a few of the poems to the class I asked them to divide their paper into four quadrants.  Each quadrant was then labeled with one of the five senses (they would choose 4 of 5 in total.)  They selected their preferred colour and wrote it at the top of the page as a title.  This became our brainstorming page.  Students tried to come up with four or five things for each category.  As they started to lose steam, I read them a few more of the poems, which they could hear with more attuned ears now that they were getting ready to write their own.

Once most of the class had at least three or four things in each quadrant (ie. three things yellow smells like, four things yellow tastes like, etc) they turned the page over and used their brainstormed ideas to construct their own colour poem.

We will type them when they’re done (which will act as an additional ‘draft’) and post them around the library among the Kandinsky-inspired artwork created by another class.

 

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