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Listening to where we live

Posted by Celia Brogan

Listening to the sounds in our local environment is a great way to enter into a study of place.

Today’s BC text is Sara Leach‘s Sounds of the Ferry. This picture book was nominated for the 2012/13 Chocolate Lily Book award. As the name implies, the narrative is full of onomatopoetic examples of what a BC ferry rider would hear on a crossing.

This text could be a great mentor text for an exercise in representing a particular place or experience through sound. Sounds of the Ferry might introduce activities to:

Sara Leach is an author and teacher-librarian who lives in Whistler, BC. Check out her CWILL profile.

Do you have a text to share that would compliment this one? Share it in the comments!

Poetry Month: day 2

This week I’m introducing found poetry to two classes of 6/7s.

There are many variations of the rules of found poetry: whether the poet must only use words from the found text, or if she can add her own; whether the found words/phrases must be used in the order they appear in the original text, or if the poet has license to move them around; whether one original text is used, or many.  Its up to you what constraints you put in place.  I used this lesson from ReadWriteThink and this description from poets.org to focus my instructions to my students.

I gave each student a short text, or excerpt.  I chose six texts so each student at every table had a different one.  I asked them to read it through once, then go through it again and underline strong words and phrases, then I asked them to make a list of what they underlined on a piece of paper in the order the bits appear in the original.  That’s as far as we got in the first period.
In the second period they each read through their list and some chose to add additional bits from the original text as they felt necessary.   I told them about the variations in ‘rules’ and let them, as writers, make their own choices regarding the “purity” of the text and the order of lines.  They have started to construct their poems.

We’ll see what my young writers come up with…

I want them to consider the ‘story’ and voice in their original text as they construct something new.  I want their new piece to have a distinctly different voice–and possibly a different story–from the original.  The example by Reznikoff in the link above from poets.org is a great snapshot of what it could be.

The texts I chose were not simple texts.  In fact, they are not ones my 6/7s would have anywhere near their fingertips.  The texts I chose were:

You may notice some addition April-related thematic work here (cherry blossom festival, Earth Day).  I though I may as well get these NF texts to double as thematic exposure too 🙂

Happy writing!

 

Reznikoff

April: Full of Poetry!

We have written posts for Poetry Month in the past but this year we are going to do it a little differently.  We will be making a poetry-themed post every school day in April.  Sometimes it will be a resource, sometimes it will be a great piece that might serve to inspire our writers (and us!), sometimes it will be a spotlight on a form one of our executive is teaching at the moment.

If one of these posts reminds you of something you do in your practice, you can share your idea in the comments.

To start the month off I will remind you that if you have students writing poetry (or prose) you may want to suggest that they submit their writing to the BCTELA student writing contest: Voices Visible.  The deadline to mail them is April 22.  Don’t forget, you must be a member of BCTELA to enter students’ work.
You can download the submission guidelines and entry form here.

Podcasting Saved My Sanity, by Leslie Forsyth-Eno

Insanity Threatened

Four years ago, as a fairly new Grade Seven classroom teacher, I discovered that I was not always the supportive, understanding type of teacher I had envisioned myself to be. Having come from a student services background I was mor e accustomed to working with students one – on – one, or in small groups, not having to meet the myriad demands of twenty – eight plus students. One area that particularly taxed my patience was the daily help students needed after school because they had been aw ay for reasons that were not necessarily related to illness viagra generique.

Podcasting Saved My Sanity, by Leslie Forsyth-Enopdf

Why Grade When They Can Reflect? by Royan Lee

The instructional video project was so fun! I’m very proud of how my video looks. I love how the voice over that I did didn’t have any sounds that I didn’t want. (the room was VERY LOUD). I had to record over and over to get it the way I wanted. I also love the way the music went so it didn’t stand out. I just wanted it to be background music.

pdfWhy Grade When They Can Reflect? by Royan Lee

Unlocking Motivation for Student Reading, by Mike Ross

Let’s face it: we are all guilty of using techniques in our practice that do not feel quite right achat viagra pilule. Oftentimes, we stick with these practices because we know that they are old stand-bys for many teachers. Sometimes, it is because we simply cannot find a better way. We may tinker with the criteria or the manner of presentation, but are never fully satisfied with the results.

pdfUnlocking Motivation for Student Reading, by Mike Ross

We Are More by Carol Walters

The 2010 Winter Olympics placed a spotlight on Vancouver, our country, and our Canadian ways. In the closing ceremonies, William Shatner and Catherine O’hara joked about rocking canoes and people who are overly quick to apologize. During opening ceremonies, Shane Koyczan told the world that, “We Are More.” But what does it mean to be Canadian? What are our Canadian symbols? How do we view ourselves and what shapes our cultural beliefs?

(more…)

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